RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES
RED HOOK LINES

RED HOOK LINES

Before Ester Grossi’s temporary relocation to Red Hook for an Art Residency at De-Construkt, she knew very little about the vibe of the area. While still in Italy, she read several articles about its history full of contradictions, how it changed from a port of considerable importance (1850-1950) to a “problematic” neighborhood in the ‘90s.

But what Ester found was fascinating was exactly these contradictions.

The first aspect she noticed in Red Hook was the dimension of the neighborhood with its small community of residents (an uncommon thing for a metropolis like New York City).

For her, the landscape was at the same time unusual (as a European) and familiar, looking like the New York of the past that we have in my mind: wooden houses, vintage cars and the bar where the whole community meets on Wednesday night to listen to live music and dance.

What she discovered is the common denominator of Red Hook’s landscape is the line. The line of the horizon of the water that surrounds the seafront, the countless intertwining electric wires along the streets, the lines of the large cranes that overlook the harbor, the geometries of old and contemporary architecture.

The line is what Ester used to transfer these impressions about Red Hook onto her canvas.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Ester Grossi, born in 1981 in Avezzano (AQ), Italy. In 2000, she received a high school diploma in Fashion, Design, and Decor. She later earned a bachelor’s degree in Television, Cinema and Multimedia Production at the University of Bologna. Ester collaborates with international film and music festivals, music labels and Italian fashion designers as well as musicians and video-artists for multimedia installations. She lives and works as a painter in Bologna, Italy.

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